Tag Archives: Lakewood

Save Lakewood Hospital

I feel like I ought to make a few notes here about Lakewood Hospital, and the grassroot campaign to save it, since I have been assisting said campaign for several weeks now.

Logo for Save Lakewood Hospital; links to campaign site

My work. Probably not destined for any design annuals, but my clients are pleased and I can argue for everything going on here.

At the risk of me-centrism, I think there are some notable aspects to the fact that I am interested in and supporting this effort.

I certainly do not seem to be from central casting, based on the other people I have met. Most of the people exercised about keeping Lakewood Hospital in business are middle-aged or older, and long-term residents. Many were born in the hospital, most have at least some personal interest in it. More than a few have longstanding axes to grind with city hall, as well.

This is not me. While it feels like I have been in Lakewood for a remarkably long time, at this point, my seven years still make me new guy compared with residents of 40, 50 or more years. Despite the fact that I have had more than enough run-ins with local healthcare, I have never been inside Lakewood Hospital for any reason; others’ fretting about having to travel a few extra miles for non-emergency care seems rather abstract to me, at best.

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Lakewood, McDonald’s and community

This one feels a long time past. I originally wrote it in mid-2011, but it seems like so long ago.* I have always felt that I did some good thinking here, however. Meanwhile, I’ve decided now is the time to repost it here in my long-term archive. Lakewood is currently confronting another top-down plan to replace a familiar piece of the community** with some sort of corporate wheeze, and one of the most vocal critics has even declared the pending liquidation of Lakewood Hospital “another McDonald’s.”

No, no and no. Among many other differences, Lakewood Hospital actually matters, I think. Whereas the arrival of McDonald’s on Detroit Road, I argued and still argue, was mostly just a petty annoyance. Unfortunately I have a growing sense that too many people cannot tell the difference, a want of perspective that cannot be helping anyone, except those powers that are content to see citizen “meddling” diffused into griping about a dozen issues rather than concentrating on doing something about one.

For this reason among others, I’m going to skip most of the opening paean to Lakewood…

Lakewood is packed with locally-owned bars and restaurants; I even did a cartographic guide to the bars once. Meanwhile, fast-food chains and big-box stores are almost unknown. The biggest “big box” is a supermarket and there’s really just no room for a walmart or home despot, etc.; there are a few chain establishments like a Schlubway and a Domino’s and a Dunkin’ Donuts, but aside from one Taco Bell the only big-league standalone drive-thru greasepits are banished to the fringes of the city and completely absent from “mainstream life” in Lakewood. (Cue ominous piano chords.) That is, for now

This morning, I got up, stumbled around through the usual re-orientation to consciousness, pulled up teh intarweb and read with dismay of the “potential McDonald’s move to Detroit Theatre property.” Sacre bleu!

Oh the ignominy. When the theater closed several weeks ago, I wasn’t really concerned since it had always looked kind of shabby and I go to a movie theater at most once every two or three years anyway. Had I known, though… the Detroit Theatre is hardly “paradise,” but on the other hand “a parking lot” would be far less demoralizing than a McDonald’s.

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Holmes, Bookshop notes Nov. 2014

Some updates on my Sherlock Holmes collection, with a visit to a new Lakewood business on the way…

After keeping my eye out for a copy for some time, I finally picked up A Study in Sherlock recently. This is now item #44 in my collection.

This is as good as I could have hoped; I believe it’s the best Holmes anthology I have read so far. (Maybe Exploits of challenges it, but only if two authors counts as an anthology.) Great variety, with a lot of tangential extrapolations of Holmes of a more thoughtful nature than, e.g., “let’s do a Holmes story but with Martians/ghosts/zombies.” No doubt these things can be good, but the inherent novelty of this kind of mashup wears off rapidly and I think you’ve got to work very hard to add some other merit. The inventive approaches in A Study in Sherlock, by contrast, offered both freshness of concept and, in most cases, quality of writing.

Lots of good stories here, and even a short, delightful comic by Colin Cotterill. Neil Gaiman will be the headline contributor for most people, and I enjoyed “The Case of Death and Honey” though I’m not quite sold on the premise. Perhaps I’m just nettled by any stories that revolve around “explaining” some major element of the canon that the author finds unpersuasive. I don’t think I’m fundamentally opposed to such efforts, but my reaction here was similar to my objections to The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, if not quite as intense. Anyway.

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Good things, August 2014

I had some tests done today. At the moment, the internet does not need my complete medical history, but I feel like noting that the whole process (though it is quite a process) went relatively well. And, all of the results were what one would hope they would be.

This has really been a good summer in fact, on a personal level. So I feel like briefly remarking on a few positive items from the past month or so (which has witnessed much that was negative, on a larger scale).

Lakewood has a nice farmer’s market every Saturday. I usually walk or bike up and buy some produce. A variety of other goods are also on offer, though, as is entertainment on may weekends.  A couple of times this summer, Diana Chittester has performed. I did not know who she was, but I liked her sound, and last Saturday I just sat listening for a while. Wonderful stage presence, even when the stage is a tiny temporary pavilion between the farmer’s market and Marc’s parking lot. I also bought her new CD, which along with all of the others she priced at “what you feel comfortable paying.” I see that it’s basically the same system online, too. Pretty cool.

I went up to Holden Arboretum for the first time a few weeks ago. That was lovely. Beautiful central area and ornamental gardens, plus some excellent hiking, at least for me. I hiked way back on the optional loop trails, and felt it for days afterward. (Fortunately I’ve at least done enough hiking that I knew to wear boots.) But it was wonderful, just getting away from everything into plain peaceful trees and nature.

A Twitter friend pointed me toward another list of archives that emphasize sharing their content to use, rather than hoarding it with copyright threats and usage tolls.

Warren Ellis has been updating a blog again. I’m not entirely sure why it’s here rather than at his main site, but whatever. I’ve been enjoying these little entries since the discovery. Meanwhile I created a favicon for my own site, here, a few days ago and its humorous homage still makes me smile.

Finally, the Opportunity rover set a new record last month. I can’t find where I saw it, now, but I recall someone making the observation around the same time that “Mars is now the only planet in our solar system populated entirely by active terrestrially manufactured robots” or something to that effect. That’s also pretty cool. Manned space flight is not really producing much excitement… but, it is possible to look on the bright side and recognize that some kind of colonization of Mars is under way.